Alternative text for images

| 0 comments

Text alternatives are a primary way of making visual information accessible, because they can be rendered through any sensory modality (for example, visual, auditory or tactile) to match the needs of the user. Providing text alternatives allows the information to be rendered in a variety of ways by a variety of user agents. For example, a person who cannot see a picture can have the text alternative read aloud using synthesized speech. The alt attribute on images is a very important accessibility attribute. Authoring useful alt attribute content requires the author to carefully consider the context in which the image …

Continue reading

A short introduction to creating accessible Microsoft PowerPoint documents

| 0 comments

PowerPoint documents are typically used for presentations – in which case tips such as the ones below will allow you to create a truly coherent presentation for all those who are attending it. By using large point text and avoiding cluttered screens, you are making the presentation easier to read for people with visual disabilities as well as people without. If you are planning on transmitting the PowerPoint electronically (such as putting it on a website), make sure that it is adequately structured and configured as to allow screen readers to read the information and understand the PowerPoint as it …

Continue reading

A short introduction to creating accessible Adobe PDF documents

| 0 comments

Creating or converting existing documents into accessible formats is a somewhat simple process. if you are not familiar with accessibility, particularly with PDF documents, then a great place to learn about the specifics is the PDF Techniques for WCAG 2.0 from W3C.  Before you begin, set the styles for titles, headings, and text in your document. By setting the styles before you begin creating the document, you can simply select the exact style of text you want without having to modify every section. These styles provide the document’s structure for the tagged PDF file. Also before you begin, set the …

Continue reading

Creating accessibile documents

| 0 comments

Creating or converting existing documents into accessible formats is a simple process. This post provides instructions on how to take advantage of the accessibility features in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Adobe Acrobat to create accessible documents. Before you begin, set the styles for titles, headings, and text in your document. By setting the styles before you begin creating the document, you can simply select the exact style of text you want without having to modify every section. These styles provide the document’s structure for the tagged PDF files as well. Also before you begin, set the overall format and spacing …

Continue reading

What is web accessibility and why should I care about it

| 0 comments

Web site accessibility results when a web site is able to be viewed and acted on by a wide range of users, including individuals who have visual, auditory or cognitive disabilities. It is the online equivalent brick and mortar accessibility, which has its origins in making physical locations accessible to people whose physical motion may be impaired. Accessibility is related to, but distinct from usability, which is the degree to which all users, not just impaired ones, can make effective use of a web sites and the associated content. The principles of design can and should be extended to people …

Continue reading

Web accessibility overview

| 0 comments

Incorporating accessibility-oriented design into the web development process, content creation, hardware, software, and services can yield benefits beyond mere compliance with regulations, such as better quality, increased flexibility and enhanced productivity for all users. According to the 2011 American Community Survey, there are 36 million Americans that have a disability. As baby boomers age the percentage of individuals with vision, hearing, and cognitive impairments will grow. Laws and Guidelines In 1986, Congress added Section 508 to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Section 508 established non-binding guidelines for IT accessibility. On August 7, 1998, President Clinton signed into law the Workforce …

Continue reading