Security via obfuscation: MAC Address

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Every network interface card has a unique 48 bit identifier known as a MAC address. This address is burned into the EEPROM on the card, and often is used by networking equipment to track users as they come and go, frequently associating MAC address to a hotel, credit card, credentials, and so on. In fact, even most consumer gear will record the MAC addresses of all computers that have ever issued DHCP requests to them, and these logs usually cannot be purged. When you combine this with the fact that most Cable/DSL service providers will also record your MAC address …

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Using the web application attack and audit framework known as w3af to test your security

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w3af is a Web Application Attack and Audit Framework is an amazing tool that is written in Python and has the capability to find more than 200 defined vulnerabilities. Not only does it look for the usual suspects such as SQL injection, it also handles crawling, bruteforce, authentication, and so much more. There are a number of vulnerability scanners both commercial and open source, but it all comes down to what you prefer. I tend to lean toward the open source community because of transparency, community involvement, and the fact there is zero cost. Unfortunately web applications pose one of …

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Intelligence and Security Professional Certification

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Next month I embark upon my journey with the Center for Governmental Services at Auburn University to obtain intelligence analytic trade-craft skills essential for analysts in today’s operational environments. My goal is to develop skills in the handling and analysis of locally generated information, intelligence as related to homeland security, and classified and unclassified intelligence generated from the various intelligence communities. This study should prove to be very informative and educational to say the least. The fact that the faculty are former senior intelligence officers and managers from the CIA, DIA, NRO, NSA, State/INR, NGA, ODNI, Military Service intelligence components, …

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Create a custom wordlist using SmeegeScrape for use in forensics or pentesting

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If you working either in forensics or penetration testing you will absolutely come across the need to create a custom word list. You may be thinking to yourself a custom word list is not needed because you have a number of lists that you have created or gathered over the years. I will not argue that have a bag of lists is not needed because I have my own collection as well. I submit to you that if you have a specific target then understanding said target will be useful when it comes to password cracking. For example, if your …

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Find and correct WordPress vulnerabilities using WPScan

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If you run a WordPress based website then you should sit up, pull out your notepad, and carefully consider the idea of running WPScan on your site in order to if you have any security vulnerabilities that may require your attention. This is not to say that WordPress is vulnerable per say, but the fact is all software contains some level of vulnerabilities and the more you know, the more you will understand and be able to better protect your site. You may be surprised to learn that CVE has 177 documented vulnerabilities over the years concerning WordPress. If you …

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Cracking MD5 using Hashcat

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If you are not familiar with Hashcat then you are in luck. Before I get started, Wikipedia states Hashcat is the self-proclaimed world’s fastest CPU-based password recovery tool. It is available free of charge, although it has a proprietary codebase. Versions are available for Linux, OSX, and Windows and can come in CPU-based or GPU-based variants. Hashcat currently supports a large range of hashing algorithms, including: Microsoft LM Hashes, MD4, MD5, SHA-family, Unix Crypt formats, MySQL, Cisco PIX, and many others. The MD5 message-digest algorithm is a cryptographic hash function producing a 128-bit (16-byte) hash value, typically expressed in text …

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